18 Jan 2016

#Sale : “Ludwika” is #free on kindle until Jan 22nd #freeonkindle

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LUDWIKA1LUDWIKA: A POLISH WOMAN’S STRUGGLE TO SURVIVE IN NAZI GERMANY IS #FREE ON AMAZON:  UNTIL JANUARY 22.

GO GET ITdownload (3)!  

Blurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi 12360399_10153067444957132_5703419004838921262_nGermany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Find it on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/LudwikaNovel/

and on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28111001-ludwika12341325_10153067415682132_1513409393298449700_n

I’m extremely hopeful for this book: It has done better than all my previous books in pre-sales and it surprisingly sold out completely at the Kensington Book Fair last Saturday, where I had presented the already released paperback version.  

Here is a review (from an Advance Review Copy) by Lorna Lee, author of “Never Turn Back” and “How Was I Supposed To Know”, to whet your apetite.

“This is the best kind of fiction—it’s based halina and ludwikaon the real life. Ludwika’s story highlights the magnitude of human suffering caused by WWII, transcending multiple generations and many nations.

WWII left no one unscarred, and Ludwika’s life illustrates this tragic fact. But she also reminds us how bright the human spirit can shine when darkness falls in that unrelenting way it does during wartime.

This book was a rollercoaster ride of action and emotion, skilfully told by Mr. Fischer, who brought something fresh and new to a topic about which thousands of stories have already been told.”

HERE ARE SOME MORE REVIEWS:

ludwika book concept (1)

5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn’t stop reading this, December 14, 2015

 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
 
Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany by Christoph Fischer starts with an introduction to the story’s protagonist, Ludwika Gierz, a 4 foot-ten inches, 22 year-old, beautiful Polish woman with piercing blue eyes. Children like her because of her friendly disposition. She has a 5 year-old daughter Irena from a non-marital relationship she had years ago, after which the father of the child left town. The well-written prose starts with subtle undertones of what lies on the horizon and we know there will be danger: the German invasion and fleeing of the townspeople, including Ludwika’s father, who disappeared with the retreat of troops; and the fact that Ludwika’s looks, her beauty, was once an asset but now is a liability as it attracts brutish German soldiers. It is a time of war with Hitler’s regime moving in and taking over, which establishes the story’s tension and conflict. In her town in Poland, Ludwika works her farm with her younger sister and mother. Siblings are mentioned, including her brother Franz who drowned in a river 2 years earlier, the memory still raw and painful. The story is off to a good start as we care about the protagonist and sense the danger that’s been alluded to. The story progresses and Ludwika encounters a Nazi soldier on the road who becomes attracted to her and protective of her, granting her rights others do not have. As Jews are being hauled off and the elderly assassinated, Ludwika is learning German from the translator that her “Nazi friend” has enlisted to help him. There’s now enough conflict in the story to propel it forward in this horrific time in history where madness prevailed. Without retelling this page turner suffice it to say that it goes deep and does not hold back as the plot moves through Ludwika’s drive to survive, and all the emotional turmoil, good and bad, that goes along with it. I’ve read several other books by this author and have to say that next to The Luck of the Weissensteiner’s this is my favorite.
 
5.0 out of 5 stars Riveting page-turner, December 20, 2015 CWBY8Hx
 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
In this World War II novel, Ludwika Gierz, a young beautiful Polish woman, suffers the loss of all the men in her life. She is still in mourning of her brother, Franz, who has drowned two years earlier when her father goes missing in action in the beginning of the war. Her mother, her sister Stacia and her young daughter Irena are left to fend for themselves on the farm while the German invaders force their neighbours off their land. Manfred, a handsome SS German officer, falls in love with Ludwika and the family is allowed the special privilege of remaining in their own home on condition that she accompany him to Germany. She is forced to leave her family behind but she believes her sacrifice will guarantee their safety. Her decision begins her horrific journey of pain and suffering as she lives first hand the humiliation of being a young innocent woman at the mercy of cruel oppressors.
Christoph Fischer’s historical novel, Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany is a riveting page-turner that presents human drama at its best.
 
5.0 out of 5 stars Ludwika, December 16, 201512360399_10153067444957132_5703419004838921262_n
 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
Great to see Christoph Fischer, author of The Three Nations trilogy, back with another classic world war 2 story. This is probably his tightest, best work yet. It’s intense and cinematic. Fans of world war two dramas will eat this one up. Well done!
*****

“Ludwika” is another suspenseful historical novel written by Christoph Fischer. It’s a unique story about a Polish woman in Germany during World War II. The author has the keen ability to reach you no matter what topic he is writing about. There is a great sense of urgency to tell the tales. This one is no exception. This might be what he does best though his other novels are all filled with a unique passion. LUDWIKA1

This is an emotional narrative that pulls on your heartstrings. Realistic and entirely gripping throughout. Not at all what I expected but once started I was hooked. Lured in by the comfortable writing style and the ease in which Lidwika’s story is told. Mr. Fischer manages to share a different angle of world war II and this specific period in time which makes for a deeply compelling read.

To know that this is based on Ludwika Gierz’s true-life events made it that much more enthralling. Her adventures, her choices and the choices that many people have lived through was told with grace and finesse. A real life force.

As sad as this tale is, there is also hope, inspiration and a spirit that sores high in the sky.

Quote ~

Ludwika hated the rollercoaster of emotions that followed. Her hopes for complete security and stability were raised again but it also brought with it the fear that they would be smashed. In the past, the moments when she dared to dream of a better life for her and her family at home had always been followed by disappointment and disillusionment. She didn’t want that to happen once again…”

***** halina and ludwika

5.0 out of 5 stars Authentic, December 18, 2015
 
 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
This is an emotional thought-provoking World War II drama that is filled with tension and well-researched authentic scenes that convey images, which are powerful and profound. “Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany” by Christoph Fischer is all the more riveting because it is based on actual events. Fischer is an accomplished author of historical fiction and this book surpasses his earlier work. “Ludwika” is the type of read which is impossible to forget. I remember the question she is asked “Are you Jewish?” The implications of those three words innocent words became chilling during World War II – the consequences were inescapable and, of course, the outcome depended on who was doing the asking . . . Highly recommended. Five stars.
 
5.0 out of 5 stars Truely a novel of substance 5*****, December 14, 2015
 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany – Kindle Edition
Christoph FischerAn atounding and emotional story. irena friend and son
19 Dec 2015

First Reviews for Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi German

2 Comments Book Reviews, News

ludwika book concept 668I’m delighted to share the first reviews for my new novel Ludwika:

5.0 out of 5 stars Couldn’t stop reading this, December 14, 2015

 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
 
Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany by Christoph Fischer starts with an introduction to the story’s protagonist, Ludwika Gierz, a 4 foot-ten inches, 22 year-old, beautiful Polish woman with piercing blue eyes. Children like her because of her friendly disposition. She has a 5 year-old daughter Irena from a non-marital relationship she had years ago, after which the father of the child left town. The well-written prose starts with subtle undertones of what lies on the horizon and we know there will be danger: the German invasion and fleeing of the townspeople, including Ludwika’s father, who disappeared with the retreat of troops; and the fact that Ludwika’s looks, her beauty, was once an asset but now is a liability as it attracts brutish German soldiers. It is a time of war with Hitler’s regime moving in and taking over, which establishes the story’s tension and conflict. In her town in Poland, Ludwika works her farm with her younger sister and mother. Siblings are mentioned, including her brother Franz who drowned in a river 2 years earlier, the memory still raw and painful. The story is off to a good start as we care about the protagonist and sense the danger that’s been alluded to. The story progresses and Ludwika encounters a Nazi soldier on the road who becomes attracted to her and protective of her, granting her rights others do not have. As Jews are being hauled off and the elderly assassinated, Ludwika is learning German from the translator that her “Nazi friend” has enlisted to help him. There’s now enough conflict in the story to propel it forward in this horrific time in history where madness prevailed. Without retelling this page turner suffice it to say that it goes deep and does not hold back as the plot moves through Ludwika’s drive to survive, and all the emotional turmoil, good and bad, that goes along with it. I’ve read several other books by this author and have to say that next to The Luck of the Weissensteiner’s this is my favorite.
 
5.0 out of 5 stars Ludwika, December 16, 201512360399_10153067444957132_5703419004838921262_n
 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
Great to see Christoph Fischer, author of The Three Nations trilogy, back with another classic world war 2 story. This is probably his tightest, best work yet. It’s intense and cinematic. Fans of world war two dramas will eat this one up. Well done!
*****

“Ludwika” is another suspenseful historical novel written by Christoph Fischer. It’s a unique story about a Polish woman in Germany during World War II. The author has the keen ability to reach you no matter what topic he is writing about. There is a great sense of urgency to tell the tales. This one is no exception. This might be what he does best though his other novels are all filled with a unique passion. LUDWIKA1

This is an emotional narrative that pulls on your heartstrings. Realistic and entirely gripping throughout. Not at all what I expected but once started I was hooked. Lured in by the comfortable writing style and the ease in which Lidwika’s story is told. Mr. Fischer manages to share a different angle of world war II and this specific period in time which makes for a deeply compelling read.

To know that this is based on Ludwika Gierz’s true-life events made it that much more enthralling. Her adventures, her choices and the choices that many people have lived through was told with grace and finesse. A real life force.

As sad as this tale is, there is also hope, inspiration and a spirit that sores high in the sky.

Quote ~

Ludwika hated the rollercoaster of emotions that followed. Her hopes for complete security and stability were raised again but it also brought with it the fear that they would be smashed. In the past, the moments when she dared to dream of a better life for her and her family at home had always been followed by disappointment and disillusionment. She didn’t want that to happen once again…”

***** halina and ludwika

5.0 out of 5 stars Authentic, December 18, 2015
 
 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
This is an emotional thought-provoking World War II drama that is filled with tension and well-researched authentic scenes that convey images, which are powerful and profound. “Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany” by Christoph Fischer is all the more riveting because it is based on actual events. Fischer is an accomplished author of historical fiction and this book surpasses his earlier work. “Ludwika” is the type of read which is impossible to forget. I remember the question she is asked “Are you Jewish?” The implications of those three words innocent words became chilling during World War II – the consequences were inescapable and, of course, the outcome depended on who was doing the asking . . . Highly recommended. Five stars.
 
5.0 out of 5 stars Truely a novel of substance 5*****, December 14, 2015
 
This review is from: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (Kindle Edition)
Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany – Kindle Edition
Christoph FischerAn atounding and emotional story. irena friend and son

Ludwika is a book of true depth and one would expect nothing less from this outstanding author. If you have read the other Fischer novels, you willl understand the quality of the writing delivered.

Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany takes you to a time of heartache, human emotion and feelings almost beyond comprehension.

Truely a novel of substance 5*****

 

Blurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi 12360399_10153067444957132_5703419004838921262_nGermany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

You can find Excerpts of the Novel here:
Excerpt One
Excerpt Two
Excerpt Three

or

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Find it on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/LudwikaNovel/

and on Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28111001-ludwika12341325_10153067415682132_1513409393298449700_n

I’m extremely hopeful for this book: It has done better than all my previous books in pre-sales and it surprisingly sold out completely at the Kensington Book Fair last Saturday, where I had presented the already released paperback version.  

(I will write more about the Book Fair later this week.)

Here is a review (from an Advance Review Copy) by Lorna Lee, author of “Never Turn Back” and “How Was I Supposed To Know”, to whet your apetite.

“This is the best kind of fiction—it’s based halina and ludwikaon the real life. Ludwika’s story highlights the magnitude of human suffering caused by WWII, transcending multiple generations and many nations.irena friend and son

WWII left no one unscarred, and Ludwika’s life illustrates this tragic fact. But she also reminds us how bright the human spirit can shine when darkness falls in that unrelenting way it does during wartime.

This book was a rollercoaster ride of action and emotion, skilfully told by Mr. Fischer, who brought something fresh and new to a topic about which thousands of stories have already been told.”ludwika book concept (1)

 

14 Dec 2015

My new release: Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany #excerpt three

2 Comments Book Reviews, News

Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany  has been released today

ludwika book concept (1)

Blurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi Germany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Here is another excerpt from the novel:
(Follow this link to a previous excerpt)

Perrystonetractor 1930sLudwika and her sister began harvesting the wheat. It was exhausting having to do such a big field only with scythes but it was the best that they could do. They had seen Karol Wojick, one of the neighbouring farmers hide parts of his machinery in a shed in the woods before he had joined the defence. Many of those who had decided to flee the invasion had taken as much of their valuables with them as possible and hidden the rest in the hope of retrieving it later. This had created a shortage of materiel and, coupled with the manpower shortage, made the farming work so much harder.
“We’ll never get it all to safety like this,” Stasia said, looking with frustration at her scythe and throwing it on the ground. “If the rain comes it will all go to waste.”
Ludwika understood.
“Keep your heart up,” she said. “Look what we’ve managed already. We can be proud.” download
She pointed at the wheat they had cut.
“We need to get it off the field, too,” Stasia added, close to tears.
“Don’t worry,” Ludwika said, trying to stay optimistic. Her sister was right, though. Something needed to be done soon. AS much as she tried, though, she couldn’t come up with any good solution. Then it hit her – the farm equipment Karol Wojick had hidden in the woods.
“I’ve got an idea,” she said and told Stasia what it was.
“You’re crossing a line,” Stasia warned her when she heard the plan. Her voice, however, carried more admiration for Ludwika’s bravery than gloom or worry.
“Sooner or later the szkopy will find the shed and take away what’s in it,” Ludwika replied defiant.
Stasia giggled at her sister using such a bad word for the Germans. Even though they were alone, she looked carefully around to see if any of the ‘castrated rams’ could hear them.
“Better it got to some use before then,” Ludwika said, serious despite the joke.
“We promised mother not to take any risks,” Stasia said, although her warning sounded half-hearted.
“You know I have to do it,” Ludwika said and Stasia nodded. “There is so much wheat,” Ludwika pointed out. “We can’t let it go to waste. We’ve got no alternative. Collecting it by hand would take too long; and you said yourself that the next rain will ruin it all. We have no choice and the Wojicks aren’t using it, are they?”
Stasia grabbed the scythe and bent down to cut more wheat.
“I’ll be waiting for you with the bushels,” she said.
Stasia was always so full of energy and optimism and Ludwika was grateful that the brief moment of weakness had been overcome.
“Be careful,” her sister added without turning around. “We all need you.”
“I will,” Ludwika replied.
It hadn’t been difficult to break the lock of Wojick’s shed and even less difficult to get an old tractor going that she found there. Her brother Franz had borrowed it often in the past. He had drowned in the river two years ago. The memory of his passing still stung Ludwicka; she missed him more than ever. But thanks to watching him closely when he used the tractor, she would be able to bring the bushels off the field and into the safety of their family farm.
Ludwika’s dark curly hair kept falling into her face as she steered the out of the woods and onto the open road. She had lost her hairband somewhere on the way and was struggling to keep a clear vision. For her this was a welcome distraction from the dangers that were looming and were foremost in her mind. That engine made a terrible noise; she worried over the attention it could bring. Would the ‘szkopy’ allow her drive on the road, she wondered? Would they confiscate the tractor if they saw her? Would they beat her as they had done with so many others for no good reason? Anything a Pole could do was automatically ‘verboten’, it seemed. If she was found, the Germans would understand, surely – the crop had to come in. It was already late in the season, since the war had delayed the harvest. What did the invaders intend to do about the harvest? They could not let the good food go to waste; didn’t they need provisions, too?
She kept her eyes steadily on the road and tried not to think about the dangers.
The Germans had not been seen around their tiny village for a few days, which had encouraged Ludwika to go ahead with this risky enterprise on her own.

Image (1)
At a height of 4 foot 10, with piercing blue eyes, an attractive bone structure and a curvy figure, Ludwika turned many a head. Her beauty, once an asset, had attracted the wrong kind of attention from the brutish soldiers. She wished for her hair band now that would help distract from her features.
The roads into the village were deserted, only some women were digging for potatoes in the neighbouring field. Przedborów had no defined village centre or a market square, most houses being small farm buildings, made of stone with simple tiled roofs or just wood, surrounded by sheds, stalls, orchards and small woods. It was difficult to know what was going on behind the next farm. What was a quiet and peaceful atmosphere in the days before the invasion, now felt eerie. The women in the field were visibly relieved when they saw that the engine noise they heard was coming from Ludwika’s tractor and not a German tank. Soon she would join Stasia on the wheat field. Ludwika hadn’t felt comfortable leaving her sister alone but today it was unavoidable. For a 17 year old, Stasia was mature in looks, and very pretty. Ludwika feared this would make her a target for passing soldiers. Stasia was also overconfident and loud and likely to do something hasty. It was a constant worry for her family.
Still, Ludwika wouldn’t know what she would do without her little sister. They supported each other in this frightening time and kept each other’s spirit up. They refused to believe the rumours that all Polish people would be deported from their properties and that their land and livestock be given to German settlers. With so many empty houses and farms around, the Germans couldn’t possibly have enough workers to take them all over? Surely the Poles who had stayed behind and hadn’t been deported would be left their possessions. Ludwika couldn’t imagine this ‘cleansing’ to happen as many feared. Regardless of how shockingly violent the force used by the occupiers had been so far, things had to calm down and sense had to prevail. All bad things would come to pass and might even return near to normal. Whenever their mother believed those rumours and got herself worked up, the sisters had each other to put things into perspective and keep calm.
Today’s desertion of the village was due to another one of those rumours. Further in the north, Germans were allegedly clearing entire villages and forcing the inhabitants to march east. The more hysterical reports even claimed that people were being led into the woods and killed by machine-gun fire. Others told stories of children being taken from their parents, allegedly to be given to childless couples in Germany. Who had heard of such cruelty?
Seeing other Polish farmers showed Ludwika that she was not the only one who believed the stories to be exaggerations and scare mongering. tn_07_Garson_Blitzkrieg_WWII_singleriflesoldier_ce
She was almost at her field and could see Stasia waving at her when she heard the sound of a motorbike behind her. On it sat a German soldier who waved at her to get to the side of the road. She pulled over, expecting him to step down and talk but he gestured her to get off the road altogether. She only had a few yards to the next crossing, behind which lay the exit to her field. When she tried driving on the man blocked her way and pulled out a gun. She ducked and lost control of the vehicle, which now swerved into the ditch by the road. The man put the gun away and mounted the tractor, pulling her roughly off it. She pointed at her field repeatedly, hoping he would understand. She didn’t speak any German. She pointed at herself and said “Ludwika” and then pointed at the field and said “Ludwika.” He finally got it and drove the tractor out of the ditch for her and onto the field as she had intended to do herself. She ran after him and managed to catch up with the tractor as he stepped down. He pointed at himself and said “Manfred”, he bowed, then did the Hitler salute and went quickly back to his motorbike. Not a minute too soon as it turned out. He only had got back on the bike and started driving when a convoy of army vehicles came up behind him and rolled past the field into the village.
Their sudden appearance was a worry.

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

halina and ludwikaBlurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi Germany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

Review (from an Advance Review Copy) by Lorna Lee, author of “Never Turn Back” and “How Was I Supposed To Know”:

“This is the best kind of fiction—it’s based on the real life. Ludwika’s story highlights the magnitude of human suffering caused by WWII, transcending multiple generations and many nations.irena friend and son

WWII left no one unscarred, and Ludwika’s life illustrates this tragic fact. But she also reminds us how bright the human spirit can shine when darkness falls in that unrelenting way it does during wartime.

This book was a rollercoaster ride of action and emotion, skilfully told by Mr. Fischer, who brought something fresh and new to a topic about which thousands of stories have already been told.”

Get the book at your Amazon

13 Dec 2015

Truth and Fiction in “LUDWIKA: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany”

2 Comments News

ludwika book concept 668My new novel Ludwika chronicles the life of a Polish woman from Przedborów working in Germany during WW2.

The book was inspired by a real story. ‘Ludwika’s family asked for my assistance in their ancestry research because I speak German and might be of use to find out more about their mother’s time in Germany. One of my other books, “The Luck of the Weissensteiners”, touches upon similar issues of Displaced People in Germany after WW2.

With strong support from my sister, who still lives in Germany, I spent several months gathering data and contacts. I was fascinated by the subject and re-read a lot of the books and sources and then decided to fictionalise Ludwika’s life.Image (1)

I think it will be more rewarding and powerful a reading experience for you to find out after you have finished the novel how much of the story is true and what is fiction, so I will not disclose more specifics here.

However, if you know of people with similar fates, still alive, show them the book. This is a picture of Ludwika, taken by the Germans ca 1944.

Her family wants to connect with relatives who might still alive in Poland and who may have known her during the war. There are still some gaps in their understanding of what has happened to Ludwika in Germany.Lud 2

People in extreme situations, like during WW2, had to make incredibly tough choices. There was no logic, guarantees or protection from the madness that raged at the time. So much bravery and hardship remains to be told and understood. By telling this story I hope to help fester humanitarian values.

 

Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany is now available for pre-order and will be released on Dec 14th

In order to present the book in London at the Kensington Christmas Book Fair in London, December 12th this year I have released the paperback version already.
Available at the CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/5897536
The cover was once again designed by the talented Daz Smith.

I have ARC copies in pdf and mobi

halina and ludwikaBlurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi Germany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

Review (from an Advance Review Copy) by Lorna Lee, author of “Never Turn Back” and “How Was I Supposed To Know”:

“This is the best kind of fiction—it’s based on the real life. Ludwika’s story highlights the magnitude of human suffering caused by WWII, transcending multiple generations and many nations.irena friend and son

WWII left no one unscarred, and Ludwika’s life illustrates this tragic fact. But she also reminds us how bright the human spirit can shine when darkness falls in that unrelenting way it does during wartime.

This book was a rollercoaster ride of action and emotion, skilfully told by Mr. Fischer, who brought something fresh and new to a topic about which thousands of stories have already been told.”

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Here is a little excerpt:

The mother still looked a little suspicious at Ludwika but as soon as the train had started she ran towards the toilet with Martin, the oldest of her boys. He had soiled himself by now, unable to wait and she had to clean him up and put some fresh clothes on. Ludwika smiled at the obedience to rules the young mother had demonstrated by not going to the bathroom, even though it was a child emergency. It occurred to her that from now on she would probably have to conform to the same bureaucracy and strictness.

By the time mother and son returned Ludwika had already made good friends with the remaining three, who were busy teaching her more German nursery rhymes. Martin, the young boy in new clothes, also joined in. The woman watched in awe as her children were completely taken in by Ludwika, almost oblivious to their mother. Once the inspector had seen and validated all of their tickets, the German woman took out a book and read. Ludwika froze when she saw that it was a book written by Adolf Hitler himself.

She heard her father’s encouragement in her head to keep going and not to worry about anything before there was a need for it. It was true, the woman would mean her no harm, not while Ludwika was taking care of the children.

After the singing had stopped the children told her about their grandparents’ big villa by the Alster in Hamburg and how they looked forward to eating ice cream at its shore. The mother had obviously decided to leave her to it and only occasionally spared a glance around the compartment, the rest of the time her head was turned towards the window and deep into her book. Undeterred, Ludwika was grateful for the children’s company and the happiness it brought her. The oldest boy, he looked about six, asked her to read them a story from their book and she happily obliged. It would be good practice for her. She found it very difficult, however, and the children didn’t seem to understand her renditions of a German folk tale.ww2_3_children_carrot_sticks

The mother put her book down now and took the seat beside Ludwika.

“Don’t give up so easily,” she said. Ludwika couldn’t make out if the woman was scolding her or meant to encourage her. The tone was harsh but the face seemed benign.

Ludwika started a different fairy tale, and every time she mispronounced a word the woman would step in and correct her with surprising patience, while one by one the children fell asleep in their seats.

“You’re not bad at all for a foreigner,” the woman whispered. “Your German will get better over time. Don’t lose heart and keep going, then it will become easier and soon take care of itself.”

She looked her up and down.

“Where are you from, Ludwika?”

“Poland,” she replied, a little nervous.

“I know that, but which city?” the mother asked.

“Near Breslau,” Ludwika decided on.

“Are you Jewish?”

Ludwika jerked and shook her head vehemently.

“No,” she said quickly.

“Then I’ve got to thank you,” the mother replied, relieved. “My name is Irmingard. Irmingard Danner. You saved my life by giving me those two precious hours to read.” She looked towards the door and then she added in a low voice, so that nobody could hear: “My husband Erich has been hassling me to read that Hitler book for weeks now. My father-in-law works for the publishers and is a big shot in the party, too. He’s bound to ask me questions about it. I can’t make myself read the damn thing. Don’t you, too, find politics is so boring? As hard as I try, after ten minutes I can’t remember what I’ve read earlier. Today was the first time I could concentrate and I will be able to say at least a few intelligent things about it and do my husband proud.”

12 Dec 2015

Displaced People in Germany after WW2 and my new novel Ludwika

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ludwika book concept 668My new novel Ludwika chronicles the life of a Polish woman from Przedborów working in Germany during WW2.

Millions of People from the East were forced to work under harsh conditions as ‘Ostarbeiter’ for a labour short Reich.

It is a subject often neglected because it pales in comparison to the horrors that occurred during that period.
When we hear Displaced People we know they are not just Holocaust survivors from the death camps but stories about the relocation of the Displaced People often focus on Jews trying to get to Palestine.

What happened to the rest of them in the chaos that followed German’s Capitulation is little known about. My novel Ludwika tries to shed some light on that topic, and I tried to show what life was like for Polish people in Germany during the war.

Ludwika’s story is one of many to be told that doesn’t involve as tragic a life than those in Auschwitz but from her perspective it was no ‘Luck’ either.

Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany is now available for pre-order and will be released on Dec 14th

Image (1)In order to present the book in London at theKensington Christmas Book Fair in London, December 12th this year I have released the paperback version already.
Available at the CreateSpace eStore:https://www.createspace.com/5897536
The cover was once again designed by the talentedDaz Smith.

I have ARC copies in pdf and mobi

 

Blurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi Germany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

Review (from an Advance Review Copy) by Lorna Lee, author of “Never Turn Back” and “How Was I Supposed To Know”:

“This is the best kind of fiction—it’s based on the real life. Ludwika’s story highlights the magnitude of human suffering caused by WWII, transcending multiple generations and many nations.

WWII left no one unscarred, and Ludwika’s life illustrates this tragic fact. But she also reminds us how bright the human spirit can shine when darkness falls in that unrelenting way it does during wartime.

This book was a rollercoaster ride of action and emotion, skilfully told by Mr. Fischer, who brought something fresh and new to a topic about which thousands of stories have already been told.”Lud 2

The book was inspired by a real story. ‘Ludwika’s family asked for my assistance in their ancestry research because one of my other books, “The Luck of the Weissensteiners”, touches upon similar issues of Displaced People in Germany after WW2. With strong support from my sister, who still lives in Germany, I spent several months gathering data and contacts. I was fascinated by the subject and re-read a lot of the books and sources and then decided to fictionalise Ludwika’s life.

People in extreme situations, like during WW2, had to make incredibly tough choices. There was no logic, guarantees or protection from the madness that raged at the time. So much bravery and hardship remains to be told and understood. By telling this story I hope to help fester humanitarian values.

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Here is a little excerpt:

The mother still looked a little suspicious at Ludwika but as soon as the train had started she ran towards the toilet with Martin, the oldest of her boys. He had soiled himself by now, unable to wait and she had to clean him up and put some fresh clothes on. Ludwika smiled at the obedience to rules the young mother had demonstrated by not going to the bathroom, even though it was a child emergency. It occurred to her that from now on she would probably have to conform to the same bureaucracy and strictness.

By the time mother and son returned Ludwika had already made good friends with the remaining three, who were busy teaching her more German nursery rhymes. Martin, the young boy in new clothes, also joined in. The woman watched in awe as her children were completely taken in by Ludwika, almost oblivious to their mother. Once the inspector had seen and validated all of their tickets, the German woman took out a book and read. Ludwika froze when she saw that it was a book written by Adolf Hitler himself.

She heard her father’s encouragement in her head to keep going and not to worry about anything before there was a need for it. It was true, the woman would mean her no harm, not while Ludwika was taking care of the children.

After the singing had stopped the children told her about their grandparents’ big villa by the Alster in Hamburg and how they looked forward to eating ice cream at its shore. The mother had obviously decided to leave her to it and only occasionally spared a glance around the compartment, the rest of the time her head was turned towards the window and deep into her book. Undeterred, Ludwika was grateful for the children’s company and the happiness it brought her. The oldest boy, he looked about six, asked her to read them a story from their book and she happily obliged. It would be good practice for her. She found it very difficult, however, and the children didn’t seem to understand her renditions of a German folk tale.ww2_3_children_carrot_sticks

The mother put her book down now and took the seat beside Ludwika.

“Don’t give up so easily,” she said. Ludwika couldn’t make out if the woman was scolding her or meant to encourage her. The tone was harsh but the face seemed benign.

Ludwika started a different fairy tale, and every time she mispronounced a word the woman would step in and correct her with surprising patience, while one by one the children fell asleep in their seats.

“You’re not bad at all for a foreigner,” the woman whispered. “Your German will get better over time. Don’t lose heart and keep going, then it will become easier and soon take care of itself.”

She looked her up and down.

“Where are you from, Ludwika?”

“Poland,” she replied, a little nervous.

“I know that, but which city?” the mother asked.

“Near Breslau,” Ludwika decided on.

“Are you Jewish?”

Ludwika jerked and shook her head vehemently.

“No,” she said quickly.

“Then I’ve got to thank you,” the mother replied, relieved. “My name is Irmingard. Irmingard Danner. You saved my life by giving me those two precious hours to read.” She looked towards the door and then she added in a low voice, so that nobody could hear: “My husband Erich has been hassling me to read that Hitler book for weeks now. My father-in-law works for the publishers and is a big shot in the party, too. He’s bound to ask me questions about it. I can’t make myself read the damn thing. Don’t you, too, find politics is so boring? As hard as I try, after ten minutes I can’t remember what I’ve read earlier. Today was the first time I could concentrate and I will be able to say at least a few intelligent things about it and do my husband proud.”

halina and ludwikairena friend and son

german-pow-koenigsberg-april-1945Displaced weiss 1.5

Ostpreussischer Flüchtlingstreck 1945

09 Dec 2015

Poland during World War 2 and my new novel Ludwika

Comments Off on Poland during World War 2 and my new novel Ludwika News

My new novel Ludwika starts in Przedborów Poland, October 1939.ludwika book concept 668

When we think about 1939 we immediately think World War 2 and when we do so, we think Holocaust, Concentration Camps and Jews.

Although we know that Hitler’s invasion of Poland kicked off WW2, we tend to know about Stalingrad, the Battle of Britain and the landing of the Allies on D Day.

If we think about Poland at all, we think of the Warsaw Ghetto, The Warsaw Uprising and little beyond that.

I say we, because that was me, until last year. A conversation with a friend of Polish ancestry made me wonder what life in occupied Poland would have been like.

Border Regions were annexed into the German Reich. With the frequent changes of the borders of Poland and Germany many Polish Citizens at the time were Germans or Aryans and they were immediately accepted as members of the enlarged Reich. Others were not so lucky and were forced to leave their homes and were pushed towards the East. Later, when the military machine took away most German men from civilian work projects, Hitler forced people from Poland and other Eastern Countries to work on German soil.

Ludwika’s story is one of many to be told, a story that doesn’t involve as tragic a life than of those sent to Auschwitz; but from her perspective it was no ‘Luck’ either.

Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany is now available for pre-order and will be released on Dec 14th

Image (1)In order to present the book in London at the Kensington Christmas Book Fair in London, December 12th this year I have released the paperback version already.
Available at the CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/5897536
The cover was once again designed by the talented Daz Smith.

I have ARC copies in pdf and mobi

Blurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi Germany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

Review (from an Advance Review Copy) by Lorna Lee, author of “Never Turn Back” and “How Was I Supposed To Know”:

“This is the best kind of fiction—it’s based on the real life. Ludwika’s story highlights the magnitude of human suffering caused by WWII, transcending multiple generations and many nations.

WWII left no one unscarred, and Ludwika’s life illustrates this tragic fact. But she also reminds us how bright the human spirit can shine when darkness falls in that unrelenting way it does during wartime.

This book was a rollercoaster ride of action and emotion, skilfully told by Mr. Fischer, who brought something fresh and new to a topic about which thousands of stories have already been told.”Lud 2

The book was inspired by a real story. ‘Ludwika’s family asked for my assistance in their ancestry research because one of my other books, “The Luck of the Weissensteiners”, touches upon similar issues of Displaced People in Germany after WW2. With strong support from my sister, who still lives in Germany, I spent several months gathering data and contacts. I was fascinated by the subject and re-read a lot of the books and sources and then decided to fictionalise Ludwika’s life.

People in extreme situations, like during WW2, had to make incredibly tough choices. There was no logic, guarantees or protection from the madness that raged at the time. So much bravery and hardship remains to be told and understood. By telling this story I hope to help fester humanitarian values.

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Here is a little excerpt:

The mother still looked a little suspicious at Ludwika but as soon as the train had started she ran towards the toilet with Martin, the oldest of her boys. He had soiled himself by now, unable to wait and she had to clean him up and put some fresh clothes on. Ludwika smiled at the obedience to rules the young mother had demonstrated by not going to the bathroom, even though it was a child emergency. It occurred to her that from now on she would probably have to conform to the same bureaucracy and strictness.

By the time mother and son returned Ludwika had already made good friends with the remaining three, who were busy teaching her more German nursery rhymes. Martin, the young boy in new clothes, also joined in. The woman watched in awe as her children were completely taken in by Ludwika, almost oblivious to their mother. Once the inspector had seen and validated all of their tickets, the German woman took out a book and read. Ludwika froze when she saw that it was a book written by Adolf Hitler himself.

She heard her father’s encouragement in her head to keep going and not to worry about anything before there was a need for it. It was true, the woman would mean her no harm, not while Ludwika was taking care of the children.

After the singing had stopped the children told her about their grandparents’ big villa by the Alster in Hamburg and how they looked forward to eating ice cream at its shore. The mother had obviously decided to leave her to it and only occasionally spared a glance around the compartment, the rest of the time her head was turned towards the window and deep into her book. Undeterred, Ludwika was grateful for the children’s company and the happiness it brought her. The oldest boy, he looked about six, asked her to read them a story from their book and she happily obliged. It would be good practice for her. She found it very difficult, however, and the children didn’t seem to understand her renditions of a German folk tale.ww2_3_children_carrot_sticks

The mother put her book down now and took the seat beside Ludwika.

“Don’t give up so easily,” she said. Ludwika couldn’t make out if the woman was scolding her or meant to encourage her. The tone was harsh but the face seemed benign.

Ludwika started a different fairy tale, and every time she mispronounced a word the woman would step in and correct her with surprising patience, while one by one the children fell asleep in their seats.

“You’re not bad at all for a foreigner,” the woman whispered. “Your German will get better over time. Don’t lose heart and keep going, then it will become easier and soon take care of itself.”

She looked her up and down.

“Where are you from, Ludwika?”

“Poland,” she replied, a little nervous.

“I know that, but which city?” the mother asked.

“Near Breslau,” Ludwika decided on.

“Are you Jewish?”

Ludwika jerked and shook her head vehemently.

“No,” she said quickly.

“Then I’ve got to thank you,” the mother replied, relieved. “My name is Irmingard. Irmingard Danner. You saved my life by giving me those two precious hours to read.” She looked towards the door and then she added in a low voice, so that nobody could hear: “My husband Erich has been hassling me to read that Hitler book for weeks now. My father-in-law works for the publishers and is a big shot in the party, too. He’s bound to ask me questions about it. I can’t make myself read the damn thing. Don’t you, too, find politics is so boring? As hard as I try, after ten minutes I can’t remember what I’ve read earlier. Today was the first time I could concentrate and I will be able to say at least a few intelligent things about it and do my husband proud.”

halina and ludwikairena friend and son

05 Dec 2015

“LUDWIKA: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany” is available for pre-order

Comments Off on “LUDWIKA: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany” is available for pre-order Book Reviews, News

Ludwika: A Polish Woman’s Struggle To Survive In Nazi Germany (my new historical novel) is now available for pre-order and will be released on Dec 14thludwika book concept (1)

In order to present the book in London at the Kensington Christmas Book Fair in London, December 12th this year I have released the paperback version already.
Available at the CreateSpace eStore: https://www.createspace.com/5897536
The cover was once again designed by the talented Daz Smith.

I have ARC copies in pdf and mobi

Blurb: It’s World War II and Ludwika Gierz, a young Polish woman, is forced to leave her family and go to Nazi Germany to work for an SS officer. There, she must walk a tightrope, learning to live as a second-class citizen in a world where one wrong word could spell disaster and every day could be her last. Based on real events, this is a story of hope amid despair, of love amid loss . . . ultimately, it’s one woman’s story of survival.

Review (from an Advance Review Copy) by Lorna Lee, author of “Never Turn Back” and “How Was I Supposed To Know”:

“This is the best kind of fiction—it’s based on the real life. Ludwika’s story highlights the magnitude of human suffering caused by WWII, transcending multiple generations and many nations. Image (1)

WWII left no one unscarred, and Ludwika’s life illustrates this tragic fact. But she also reminds us how bright the human spirit can shine when darkness falls in that unrelenting way it does during wartime.

This book was a rollercoaster ride of action and emotion, skilfully told by Mr. Fischer, who brought something fresh and new to a topic about which thousands of stories have already been told.”

The book was inspired by a real story. ‘Ludwika’s family asked for my assistance in their ancestry research because one of my other books, “The Luck of the Weissensteiners”, touches upon similar issues of Displaced People in Germany after WW2. With strong support from my sister, who still lives in Germany, I spent several months gathering data and contacts. I was fascinated by the subject and re-read a lot of the books and sources and then decided to fictionalise Ludwika’s life.

Lud 2

People in extreme situations, like during WW2, had to make incredibly tough choices. There was no logic, guarantees or protection from the madness that raged at the time. So much bravery and hardship remains to be told and understood. By telling this story I hope to help fester humanitarian values.

Get the book at your Amazon store: http://bookShow.me/1519539118

Here is a little excerpt:

The mother still looked a little suspicious at Ludwika but as soon as the train had started she ran towards the toilet with Martin, the oldest of her boys. He had soiled himself by now, unable to wait and she had to clean him up and put some fresh clothes on. Ludwika smiled at the obedience to rules the young mother had demonstrated by not going to the bathroom, even though it was a child emergency. It occurred to her that from now on she would probably have to conform to the same bureaucracy and strictness.

By the time mother and son returned Ludwika had already made good friends with the remaining three, who were busy teaching her more German nursery rhymes. Martin, the young boy in new clothes, also joined in. The woman watched in awe as her children were completely taken in by Ludwika, almost oblivious to their mother. Once the inspector had seen and validated all of their tickets, the German woman took out a book and read. Ludwika froze when she saw that it was a book written by Adolf Hitler himself.

She heard her father’s encouragement in her head to keep going and not to worry about anything before there was a need for it. It was true, the woman would mean her no harm, not while Ludwika was taking care of the children.

After the singing had stopped the children told her about their grandparents’ big villa by the Alster in Hamburg and how they looked forward to eating ice cream at its shore. The mother had obviously decided to leave her to it and only occasionally spared a glance around the compartment, the rest of the time her head was turned towards the window and deep into her book. Undeterred, Ludwika was grateful for the children’s company and the happiness it brought her. The oldest boy, he looked about six, asked her to read them a story from their book and she happily obliged. It would be good practice for her. She found it very difficult, however, and the children didn’t seem to understand her renditions of a German folk tale.ww2_3_children_carrot_sticks

The mother put her book down now and took the seat beside Ludwika.

“Don’t give up so easily,” she said. Ludwika couldn’t make out if the woman was scolding her or meant to encourage her. The tone was harsh but the face seemed benign.

Ludwika started a different fairy tale, and every time she mispronounced a word the woman would step in and correct her with surprising patience, while one by one the children fell asleep in their seats.

“You’re not bad at all for a foreigner,” the woman whispered. “Your German will get better over time. Don’t lose heart and keep going, then it will become easier and soon take care of itself.”

She looked her up and down.

“Where are you from, Ludwika?”

“Poland,” she replied, a little nervous.

“I know that, but which city?” the mother asked.

“Near Breslau,” Ludwika decided on.

“Are you Jewish?”

Ludwika jerked and shook her head vehemently.

“No,” she said quickly.

“Then I’ve got to thank you,” the mother replied, relieved. “My name is Irmingard. Irmingard Danner. You saved my life by giving me those two precious hours to read.” She looked towards the door and then she added in a low voice, so that nobody could hear: “My husband Erich has been hassling me to read that Hitler book for weeks now. My father-in-law works for the publishers and is a big shot in the party, too. He’s bound to ask me questions about it. I can’t make myself read the damn thing. Don’t you, too, find politics is so boring? As hard as I try, after ten minutes I can’t remember what I’ve read earlier. Today was the first time I could concentrate and I will be able to say at least a few intelligent things about it and do my husband proud.”

halina and ludwikairena friend and son

german-pow-koenigsberg-april-1945Displaced weiss 1.5

Ostpreussischer Flüchtlingstreck 1945

11 Mar 2015

“IN SEARCH OF A REVOLUTION” – Pre-release #Excerpt

4 Comments News

ISoaR Kindle CoverTwo more weeks until my new novel IN SEARCH OF A REVOLUTION will be released on March 26th. Below is the blurb and an excerpt to whet your appetite (you can already pre-order the book on Amazon)

In 1918 young Zacharias Nielsen boards a ship in Copenhagen to join the Red Guards in the Finnish Civil War. Encouraged by an idolised teacher with communist leanings, he follows the call for help from his Nordic Comrades, despite his privileged background. His best friend, Ansgar, has opposing political ideals to Zacharias but, for his own personal reasons, finds himself soon stuck in the Scandinavian North with Zacharias and Raisa, a Finnish nurse who helps them in their new life. Through the years that follow the brotherly war the trio see the political landscape in Finland and Europe change as Communists and Fascists try to make their mark and attempt to change the world order. Our heroes must find their own personal and ideological place in these turbulent times as friendship, honour, idealism and love triangles bring out some personal truths. JK002 The book spans almost thirty years of history and the various Finnish conflicts: Civil War, Winter War, Continuation War and the Lapland War. Watch the political and personal self discovery of characters in search of their own revolution.

Here is a short excerpt from the book:

Chapter 1: A Tavern in Copenhagen, January 1918

copenhagen-237561_640Zacharias Nielsen’s mind was full of joyous anticipation, so much, he could hardly stay put in his seat. Even when he was sitting his legs were shaking fast and his hands were rubbing nervously up and down his trouser legs. The thought of the ship journey tomorrow morning was almost too much to bear. An electric pulse ran down his spine whenever the thought recurred: It was really happening.  The tavern was dark so Zacharias had to strain his eyes whenever someone entered the room. He sat on a hard wooden bench behind a long narrow trestle table near one of the corners so he could see both the entrance and the serving bar. His drinking companion and dear friend, Ansgar, could not help smiling.  “I’ll be missing your over-excitement the most,” he said. Zacharias shrugged his shoulders, smiled and continued to stare at the entrance to the tavern. in search of a revolution - redoneIn the summer this place was always heaving with bicycle messengers and postmen who came to unwind after their shifts, but tonight it was almost empty and the two had the large table all to themselves. The tavern was located in the basement of a large stone building near the government buildings, several few steps down from the cobblestone pavement, and with its low ceilings it always felt dark and cozy, even in the summer. In winter, the early nightfall turned the countryside too soon to darkness, and the resulting lack of custom gave the place an empty and incomplete feeling.  With the days so short, it always felt as if it were much later than it actually was, and somehow that seemed to persuade most of the regulars to go home earlier, or not to come out drinking at all.  Beside the two friends, only a handful of customers were there, all chatting quietly instead of engaged in often noisy arguments and beer-fuelled discussions. images (5)“Where is everybody?” Zacharias asked, his eyes scouring the dark interior “Everyone’s been invited!” He took off his cap and ran his hand through his curly blond hair before putting the cap back on. Even though he was wearing thick grey trousers and a heavy winter coat, he looked unhealthily slim, an impression that was not helped by his pale complexion and his restless behaviour. “It’s cold and dark,” Ansgar pointed out calmly. Much taller and stronger built than his friend and blessed with handsome dark looks, he was physically and emotionally a stark contrast to Zacharias. “It’s hardly tempting to leave your house, especially to celebrate that you are leaving all of your friends.” “Do you think they disapprove?” Zacharias asked. MarshallCG“Who can say?” Ansgar replied and took a sip from his beer. “Joining the war in Finland on the side of the Reds will impress some of them, of that I am sure. They might not to turn up because they haven’t got the guts to do it themselves.” “Who wouldn’t be jealous?” Zacharias said, sonding naïve and proud at the same time. “It’s the opportunity of this century, to eradicate the divide between rich and poor and to bring all humans together. Imagine what the world will be like when the revolution has come? Ansgar, that’s a much better cause to fight for than the assassination of an Austrian heir to the throne.” “I wish you were right,” Ansgar said, trying to sound serious, but the enthusiasm of his friend was infectious and he couldn’t help smiling. “About the revolution or my friends?” Zacharias asked. suojeluskunta2“Both!” Ansgar said and winked. Zacharias shrugged his shoulders and turned his attention back into the room, which he continued to scan for new arrivals. “Not everyone is like you,” Ansgar explained. “I still remember when I joined your school and the other students called me a pig and the poor farmer’s child. The endless fist fights for my honour and how nobody but you would ever speak to me at first. You never joined their banter and instead offered me a place in your life. You treated me as an equal even though you came from a far more privileged background.” “The others soon did the same,” Zacharias reminded him. “Yes, once they all learned how big my father’s pig farm was and how wealthy,” Ansgar replied dismissively. “You were a friend regardless,” he said and smiled at his friend briefly with warmth before adding in a more concerned tone: “Don’t expect much of that fraternity in Finland in the heat of a revolution. Old prejudices will always remain and no ideology can erase them from people’s minds. You’ll always be a little too posh in the eyes of your comrades, I reckon.” “Nonsense,” Zacharias replied. “I made friends with you, the farmer’s boy. I shall do the same in Finland.” “Still, your lack of prejudice separates you from the rest of us,” Ansgar said and took a sip of his beer. “It’s your strength and your weakness.” “It’s unity that makes us strong,” Zacharias replied animatedly. “Even if your family had been as poor as everyone assumed, you had a lot to contribute. If it wasn’t for you I wouldn’t know how to fight for myself. I was considered a weakling until you taught me the ropes of boxing and how to stand up to attackers. I wouldn’t dare go to a war were it not for your lessons in that regard.” 83942_kuva“In that case, I wish I hadn’t taught you,” Ansgar said in a serious tone but with a broad smile. “I don’t want to lose a friend because the Grand Duchy of Finland can’t make up its mind what kind of country it is going to be. I’d rather you got injured in the boxing ring.”

The book on Amazon: http://smarturl.it/SearchofRevolution

and on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25113498-in-search-of-a-revolution

Meanwhile “The Luck of the Weissensteiners”, my first historical novel about Slovakia during WW2 is part of a multi-author $.099 10 book box set: “At Odds with Destiny”

Bestselling, critically acclaimed, and notoriously creative authors from across the book continuum join forces to bring you At Odds with Destiny, everything you’ve wanted in a boxed set but thought you’d never find: full-length novels brimming with myth, fantasy, mystery, history, romance, drama, originality, heroism, and suspense. Finding themselves at odds with destiny, the characters in these stories fight to shape their future and define who they are. Come follow them in their amazing journeys.

✿ Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00SHYGG7C/
✿ Nook: http://tinyurl.com/at-odds4nook
✿ iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/id959421650
✿ Kobo: http://store.kobobooks.com/en-US/ebook/at-odds-with-destiny
✿ Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/511673

 

CHRISTOPH FISCHER 922159_10151345337037132_1303709604_o

Short Biography:

Christoph Fischer was born in Germany, near the Austrian border, as the son of a Sudeten-German father and a Bavarian mother. Not a full local in the eyes and ears of his peers he developed an ambiguous sense of belonging and home in Bavaria. He moved to Hamburg in pursuit of his studies and to lead a life of literary indulgence. After a few years he moved on to the UK where he now lives in a small hamlet, not far from Bath.  He and his partner have three Labradoodles to complete their family.

Christoph worked for the British Film Institute, in Libraries, Museums and for an airline. ‘The Luck of The Weissensteiners’ was published in November 2012; ‘Sebastian’ in May 2013 and The Black Eagle Inn in October 2013. “Time To Let Go” , his first contemporary work was published in May 2014, and “Conditions” in October 2014. His medical thriller “The Healer” was released in January 2015.

He has written several other novels which are in the later stages of editing and finalisation.

Website: http://www.christophfischerbooks.com/

Blog: http://writerchristophfischer.wordpress.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6590171.Christoph_Fischer

Amazon: http://ow.ly/BtveY

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CFFBooks

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/christophffisch/

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/106213860775307052243

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=241333846

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/WriterChristophFischer?ref=hl

15 Jan 2015

At last: THE HEALER is live on Amazon

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The wait is over. If you pre-ordered the book, it will be on your kindle already. The paperback will be out later today.  

http://smarturl.it/thehealerthriller

healer twitterb

 

Well maybe that’s a very confident statement…
Anyway, here are the reviews so far:

The Healer by Christoph Fischer is a book you must read as soon as it is released. You do not want to run the risk that the buzz about the book will spoil this thriller for you. The book is, of course, well-written. It’s a quick read that you will want to hurtle through in an afternoon, or over a weekend. At its core are interesting, enigmatic characters, and a clever plot. The story is told from the point of view of the main character, Erica Whittaker, who in midlife is diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer. It comes as no surprise that she’s desperate. Traditional medicine has nothing more to offer her. She is about to give up and accept her fate when, at the urging of her devoted office assistant, Hilda, Erica decides to pursue another path. That path takes her to the door of a once-renowned faith healer, Arpan. Using a different name, the man is, virtually, a recluse. A man with a mysterious past, Arpan also possesses a great gift, as testimonials from previous recipients of his healing bear out. He is, at first, reluctant to treat Erica. When he finally takes Erica on as a client, his treatment unleashes a series of unfortunate events, as big pharma and other opponents from his past, line up against him. Erica, who has secrets of her own, soon finds herself caught up in a web of intrigue, being stalked, cornered, and manipulated, fighting for her life. Will she survive? What will happen to Arpan, and those around him? You’ll have to read the book, of course, to find out. Quite entertaining and well worth the read, this book is highly recommended.
When advertising executive Erica Whittaker is diagnosed with terminal cancer, western medicine fails her. The only hope left for her to survive is controversial healer Arpan. She locates the man whose touch could heal her but finds he has retired from the limelight and refuses to treat her.  Erica, consumed by stage four pancreatic cancer, is desperate and desperate people are no longer logical nor are they willing to take no for an answer. Arpan has retired for good reasons, casting more than the shadow of a doubt over his abilities. So begins a journey that will challenge them both as the past threatens to catch up with him as much as with her.  Can he really heal her? Can she trust him with her life? And will they both achieve what they set out to do before running out of time?

***** The Healer Book

The story opens with Erica, a pancreatic cancer patient, having just finished a bout of radiation. She is out in the Wales’ countryside in search of a Guru healer, Arpan. The lush countryside descriptions and crisp dialogue instantly drew me into the story, as well as my instant liking and empathy for the protagonist Erica, who’s desperate to find a cure to her illness. Arpan is her answer and when she is immediately rejected by him, his icy voice (coming from inside his humble dwelling) jumps off the page as she begs, “I’m very ill. You are my only hope,” he responds, “You’ve come to the wrong place.” She continues to beg him to share his gift, to save her life, even with this, he asks her to leave. How can one not want to continue reading this story to find out what happens, so thick is the initial tension and conflict that drives the story. When she falls to her knees and he softens a little she says his name and he again rejects her stating that his name is Amesh, one that suits him better. He explains that the man who could help her disappeared with the name, garnering some sympathy for this character, leaving the reader to wonder what his story is and why he is so resistant to helping this struggling, suffering woman. Finally, he comes out of his home and they meet. He’s not what she expected, a bare shell of the man she’d seen images of, a mere reflection of his earlier self as Arpan.
When Amesh’s apprentice, Anuj, leads her off the property there is much rich and wise dialogue, “I’m his apprentice and I, too, can see the disorder in your life that needs to be rectified. You carry hurt and anger with you. Your disease has prompted you to fast track those issues and sort them out. Look into your heart and you will find this to be true.”
Her car is broken down and she is told to walk to the nearest place but when she arrives no one is there so she returns to Amesh’s place. Then Amesh, invites her in to rest. When she felt Amesh’s hands on her shoulders, the warmth of his hands radiated powerfully through her body. And thus, the healing begins—for both of them. As the author Christoph Fischer moves the story along, we encounter mysterious events, intrigue, and the power of the mind interspersed into scenes and dialogue. When all is said and done, and Erica returns to have her follow-up scans, an unfriendly doctor challenges her with, “What is it you want from this scan,” Dr Kowalski asked, still in a tone that sounded unfriendly. “The notes from your doctor indicate clearly that the tumor is very advanced, and you know that. So why are we looking at it again? Is it a second opinion you want, or do you want to see how fast it grows?” No spoilers with how this all turns out but one can surmise they will be glued to the page as they navigate through corruption, betrayal, illusions, and one mystery after another, right up to the very last sentence in the epilogue, which I didn’t see coming. This was an interesting read, a very satisfying read, with so much of the human condition playing into the scenes: desperation, fear, hope, joy, conniving, greed, and trust. Another great story by the talented Christoph Fischer.

***** Healer book

One of the best books I’ve read in a while, and written by a true craftsman, who knows his stuff. Set in UK and Europe, The HEALER covers areas that fascinate me, both geographic and medical, but from a whole new perspective. The research is detailed, and the plot has me wondering just what the various characters’ truths are. We have Erica/Maria as the woman diagnosed with Grade 4 pancreatic cancer seeking a miracle cure. And her workplace junior, Hilda, who becomes her best friend and support. Enter Amesh/Arpan, the hippy guru-styled healer, who believes he has lost his healing mission due to pharmaceutical giants, who in turn feel their empire is under threat if this healer is not completely shut down. But then again, with all their backing millions, they have been trying for a score of years or more, and Arpan has survived. Sure he went to ground, but… So add in his protégé, Anuj, who is more like a son to Arpan than protégé. Then there are the friends who are not as they first appear, and the enemies who are not as they first appear.
So deftly woven is this story as to make an early assumption naïve.
I am a great fan of Fischer’s books, and know that when I choose one, I will not in any way be disappointed. This is yet another, to join my growing select collection.

***** Prayer-can-Heal-yes-or-no

I have read several books by this author, enjoyed all of them but ‘The Healer’, by far, is my favorite. In this novel, author Christoph Fischer, tackles a subject near and dear to my heart; the medical profession and the impact of physician decision making on individuals particularly those with severe medical conditions and diseases.

In Fischer’s novel, we meet Erica in the aftermath of a round of chemotherapy intended to treat her pancreatic cancer. Readers learn very quickly that Erica is seeking the impossible; healing. We empathize with Erica knowing that she has one of the most painful and fatal forms of cancer. While Erica’s “hair had not fallen out from the chemo…it turned gray and made her look much older than she was. People used to think of Erica as at least five years younger than she actually was, now people thought she was five years older. She looked tiny and felt thin and weak.”

Out of desperation and the advice of her assistant, Erica searches for a renown spiritual guru known for his non-traditional unusual treatment protocols and more importantly for his fees. She persuades recluse Arpan self re-named Amesh to use his gift to heal her body in exchange for emptying her bank account.

Believing she’s fully healed, Erica returns to her job basically broke but thankful for her life and ability to go forward.

Without spoilers, the author convincingly creates a story line, over and above the medical treatment issues, that revolves around core concepts such as faith, trust, relationships, integrity and more. He craftily develops the plot to allow for suspicion, anticipation and ‘in the box’ conclusions. While it could be easy for many readers to neatly make certain assumptions and form a simple conclusion, I was unable to do so. Perhaps it is because of my familiarity and extreme sensitivity (I must admit) to many of the topics raised in this outstanding novel, I completed the book having a myriad of questions and thoughts. I’d love for the author to have a sequel to this book. If he’d already written it, I would purchase it today!

Congratulations Christoph Fischer on another great book! Keep them coming. images (1)


Amazon:
http://smarturl.it/thehealerthriller

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheHealerNovelbyChristophFischer?ref=hl

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23662030-the-healer

10 Jan 2015

Review of “SEBASTIAN”: Family, War, Community – Captivating Historical Fiction #asmsg

4 Comments Book Reviews, News
17834808That wonderful moment when a reader sees in your book exactly what you meant them to. Here’s a new and much appreciated review for my second book: Sebastian.

5.0 out of 5 stars

Family, War, Community – Captivating Historical Fiction, January 9, 2015

This review is from: Sebastian (The Three Nations Trilogy Book 2) (Kindle Edition)
Sebastian is rich with history, family relationships, struggle, and the bonds that tie families together. Christoph writes with such a down to Earth flavor that you become part of this family and are immediately drawn into the despair a mother feels when her son must lose his leg. The inner family squabbles and bantering that are innate in every family are present and continue as war intrudes more into their lives. As the complexities of each characters inner thoughts play out, throughout the story, you as the reader gain insight into the background of those feelings. The author transports you to a time in history many know nothing about, yet educates you while seamlessly keeping you in the story. Christoph has a magic touch with words taking us through the years with clean, precise, well researched, storytelling. He hits on the very personal nature of each characters emotional turmoil, misinterpretations, and manipulations, all of which are spun from their own insecurities or individual needs, and inevitability affect their future. There are far too many events that I enjoyed to mention and I don’t want to give away too much but I enjoyed the early Freud experimentation by the Glueck women using Vera as their subject. Was also pleasantly surprised by interest into the spiritual realm during this time of war and understood the need for family wanting to know what had happened to missing family members. Sebastian is a story that will have you facing the flaws of human emotion, and have you rooting for love. This is an inspirational story of community and survival on many different levels. The plight of family, being handicapped, expectations, sexual preference, prejudice, political awareness, tradition, pride, self worth, and the Jewish community are spun into a brilliant and captivating historical fiction. You will love how it all comes together. Christoph Fischer, is an author whose stories deserve recognition and being thoroughly enjoyed.

P1120877Link to a previous post on Sebastian

Sebastian (Three Nations Trilogy Book 2)

Sebastian is the story of a young man who has his leg amputated before World War I. When his father is drafted to the war it falls on to him to run the family grocery store in Vienna, to grow into his responsibilities, bear loss and uncertainty and hopefully find love.
Sebastian Schreiber, his extended family, their friends and the store employees experience the ‘golden days’ of pre-war Vienna and the timed of the war and the end of the Monarchy while trying to make a living and to preserve what they hold dear.
Fischer convincingly describes life in Vienna during the war, how it affected the people in an otherwise safe and prosperous location, the beginning of the end for the Monarchy, the arrival of modern thoughts and trends, the Viennese class system and the end of an era.
As in the first part of the trilogy, “The Luck of The Weissensteiners” we are confronted again with themes of identity, Nationality and borders. The step back in time made from Book 1 and the change of location from Slovakia to Austria enables the reader to see the parallels and the differences deliberately out of the sequential order. This helps to see one not as the consequence of the other, but to experience them as the momentary reality as it must have felt for the people at the time.

On Amazon: http://smarturl.it/TNTSeb
On Goodreads: http://ow.ly/pthHZ
On Facebook: http://ow.ly/pthNy
Trailer: http://studio.stupeflix.com/v/95jvSpHf5a/
B&N http://ow.ly/Btvbw

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