22 Aug 2014

An opportunity to discuss “TIME TO LET GO”

3 Comments News

 

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Goodreads has its flaws

with the hateful trolls and system errors,download (1)

yet,

let’s not forget that it was set up initially to bring together readers and books.  

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One of the discussion groups over at Goodreads votes for two books to discuss amongst them each month.

TIME TO LET GO 
time-to-go-books2 big

 

 

has been nominated as one of the books for September, so this is your opportunity to talk about the book with other readers.

That is if……

you want to do this

and

if the book gets selected.

 

 

You have three days to vote for the book you would like to discuss.  Voting will remain open until the 24nd. Here is the link to the vote.

https://www.goodreads.com/poll/show/107430-what-would-you-like-to-read-discuss-in-september

Here are some recent reviews to get you in the mood: 6a00d83452c37169e2014e8ab9b06e970d

5.0 out of 5 stars interesting, August 21, 2014
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Time to Let Go (Kindle Edition)
interesting book on letting go of the hard things to let go of made me think
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyed the book as have had family going through this, August 19, 2014
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Time to Let Go (Kindle Edition)
Enjoyed the book as have had family going through this. Book just stopped rather than ended. Would have appreciated a better ending.
5.0 out of 5 stars I was disappointed in the ending, August 18, 2014
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Time to Let Go (Kindle Edition)
Was a very interesting and insightful read. I was disappointed in the ending, it seemed a bit abrupt.
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Letting Go, August 17, 2014
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Time to Let Go (Kindle Edition)
Christoph Fischer has written a beautiful story in Time to Let Go. At one point, I had to stop reading because the story hit so close to home I was crying and couldn’t read the words. You easily fall in love the characters. The realism makes you wonder if the author has experienced the drama of Alzhiemer’s. Not letting go of Time to Let Go.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Time to Let Go is a fictional story about a …, August 16, 2014
By
Joyce Hislop (Pennsylvania, USA) – See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Time to Let Go (Kindle Edition)
Time to Let Go is a fictional story about a retired couple living in England, where Walter is caregiver at home to Biddy, who is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. At first glance the reader might be put off by the subject matter, but the author quickly weaves a varied plot around Walter’s established and protective routine with Biddy and the arrival of their adult daughter, an airline stewardess who has experienced a serious event with a passenger on a recent flight and temporarily on leave while it is being investigated. Hanna and her brothers become more deeply involved in their parents’ lives and one another’s’ differences as they each cope with their own histories with their father, and now the responsibilities of offering care to their elderly parents without compromising the Seniors’ dignity. Meanwhile, Hanna has an unexpected opportunity to build a new relationship, and this leads to challenges she didn’t expect.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, August 16, 2014
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Time to Let Go (Kindle Edition)
Enjoyed book for most part.
I especially liked learning more about how people cope with Alzhelmers Disease.
And one from Amazon.co.uk:

The theme of this novel is so important to so many people that reviewers have tended to focus on that; and indeed Christoph Fischer handles his subject with a delicate sensitivity which impresses. But I’d like to focus, instead, on the skill and creativity with which Fischer brings his characters to life, plunges deep inside their emotions and thoughts, and makes us feel that we know them and know all about them. Hanna, an attractive woman who has escaped from the constant putdowns of her father during her growing years to create an exciting and fulfilling life for herself as an air hostess, has experienced the death of a passenger and is going through the turmoil, both emotional and practical, which this has brought her. Going home for a few days rest she is drawn inevitably into the situation caused by her mother’s disease. Walter, her father, a man set in his own ways and with very definite opinions, believes that the way to treat his wife Biddy is to keep her to a regular routine. Hanna thinks a little change and excitement would be more stimulating for her mother. As we see the results of this conflict we learn more and more about Walter and about Hanna. Then there is the elder son, Henrik, who thinks his mother needs the professional care she would get in a Home. Henrik, a successful businessman, has spent his life proving that he is better than his younger brother Patrick, and finding continually that his father cares more about Patrick than about him. Patrick himself has cut himself off from his family and refuses even to visit Biddy, because he is afraid to reveal his secrets to his father. This all makes for fascinating and engrossing reading. There are moments of happiness, such as the joyful reaction of Biddy to the dog and the swans, both when she is with Hanna and then later with Walter; and there are times of deep sadness as when Walter tries to force his wife to remember something which is clearly beyond her ability. Walter’s love for Biddy, which is so important to him, humanises a man who might otherwise seem hard and stern.
Quite apart from the character drawing, this is a very well written book. It has a style which never drags and which is never wordy or annoying. Once started, I felt myself drawn in and wanting to go on reading.
Time To Let Go is far above most of the books I’ve read recently.

written by
Christoph Fischer was born in Germany in 1970 as the son of a Sudeten-German father and a Bavarian mother. ‘The Luck of The Weissensteiners’ is his first published work. He has written several other novels which are in the later stages of editing and finalisation.

3 Responses to “An opportunity to discuss “TIME TO LET GO””

  1. victoria dougherty says:

    Voted and looking forward to discussing 🙂

  2. Barbara A Martin says:

    As always, a very thought provoking critique.

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